What states have full glass coverage?

States with full glass coverage have varying rules for replacements, repairs, and deductibles. States like Florida, Kentucky, and South Carolina have full glass coverage.

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UPDATED: Jun 2, 2022

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Written By: Laura BerryReviewed By: Joel OhmanUPDATED: Jun 2, 2022Fact Checked

Here's what you need to know...

  • Your state’s laws could dictate exactly how much you pay
  • Know your rights in choosing the repair parts and vendor
  • You could live in one of the eight zero-deductible states

There are many scenarios that can result in broken windows or windshields. We get it — replacing any glass damage in your car can be expensive. What states have full glass coverage? Knowing if you live in one of the states that offer free windshield replacement can help you be prepared if you’re ever in need.

With so many state-specific laws, you may wonder, is my broken windshield covered by insurance? Let’s start by discussing the areas where state laws and auto glass coverage options differ. This will help you know what questions you should be asking.

It’s all about you. We want to help you make the right coverage choices. It’s never a bad time to begin your insurance search. Before learning more about what states have full glass coverage, enter your ZIP code above for free insurance quotes in your area.

How do I get a windshield replacement?

Windshield coverage laws often cause drivers to shake their heads. Luckily, this section will help you learn the basics so that you can replace your windshield effectively.

Key Windshield Replacement Facts
Windshield Replacement FactsDetailsFrom Experts...
Certain levels of coverage offer full windshield replacement. Comprehensive coverage will cover the loss minus the amount of a glass deductible.State Websites
What is full glass coverage?Covers broken safety glass (including windshields) with no deductibleCar Windshield Info by State
Some states offer free windshield replacement. Florida, South Carolina, and Kentucky waive the deductible for windshield replacement. State Websites
Having a broken windshield is illegal to drive withDriving with a broken windshield could cost you more money in legal fees than to replace.State Websites
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Some questions consumers have are the types of parts allowed to complete a replacement and if this will be covered by insurance.

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Is your windshield glass covered by insurance?

Windshield insurance is not usually included in general liability insurance. If another party is at fault for damaging your windshield, however, the windshield damages will be covered by property damage liability.

Cracked windshields can start out as tiny stone or highway dings, which can create a chip. This type of windshield crack can slowly spread into a hairline crack, creating the risk of an even greater split or possibly a shatter in the future.

Since the windshield usually does not have to be replaced to repair a small chip, dent, or crack, the cost of the repair is relatively nominal. A cracked windshield is considered a minor repair.

You may be wondering if the cost of your windshield repair counts toward your insurance deductible.

How can I reduce my car insurance deductible? While a full windshield replacement could cost you a hefty deductible, a small windshield chip repair is much cheaper.

In these cases, insurance will usually waive the auto glass replacement deductible.

Windshield repair car insurance can’t be purchased on its own. You have to purchase it with your primary car insurance policy.

Does comprehensive coverage include auto glass?

With all the different levels of coverage, you may be asking yourself: what insurance covers auto glass? If you want to have access to a full replacement of your windshield, you will want to add comprehensive coverage to your car insurance policy.

What does fully comprehensive car insurance mean? Comprehensive car insurance is a level of auto insurance that covers your vehicle and its occupants in the event of an accident or other serious incident. While comprehensive policies carry higher premiums than basic liability insurance coverage, the peace of mind you receive from knowing you’re covered in almost all incidents is a benefit that’s priceless.

What is full glass coverage?

In specific scenarios, companies offer an extra rider for glass coverage, but is it worth it? You may already have a high deductible. If so, your glass repairs may not meet your deductible, and it would be smarter to forgo the extra glass insurance.

According to the Insurance Information Institute, some car insurance policies include zero-deductible glass coverage, which includes side windows, rear windows, and glass sunroofs.

Wondering if you can get free windshield replacement through State Farm? State Farm offers comprehensive coverage, which means that you may be able to have your windshield replaced for only the cost of your deductible.

You may be going through the process with another company, like GEICO, AAA, Progressive or USAA, for windshield replacement. If so, it’s likely one of those larger auto insurance companies will offer glass coverage under their comprehensive policy.

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How can I find windshield replacement near me?

We’ve already discussed comprehensive coverage, but did you know that fully comprehensive coverage may include auto glass replacement? On the other hand, some insurers will sell windshield replacement as an additional purchase.

Nevertheless, this type of coverage is something to be clarified in case you ever need to replace your windshield. The universe may hand you a less-than-perfect scenario, so adding comprehensive coverage to your package is a great idea.

The price of your auto insurance policy is likely to go up if you purchase comprehensive insurance. The easiest way to make your decision is to use a free quote tool to do a cost analysis of multiple companies.

Is free windshield repair really free?

You may have insurance that covers your windshield. However, given your insurance company and the state you live in, there may be different average costs to replace your windshield. Is it ever free to replace a windshield?

The table below shows a few average windshield replacement costs by insurance companies.

Windshield Replacement Costs by Insurer
CompanyAverage Windshield Replacement Cost
GeicoFree, full replacement replacement
ProgessiveFree, full replacement with comprehensive coverage
State FarmFree, full replacement with comprehensive coverage
USAAFree, full replacement with comprehensive coverage
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In truly unfortunate circumstances, you may find yourself in need of a back windshield replacement. Wondering how much a back windshield replacement costs? According to Repair Pal, this repair can cost you anywhere from $200 and $451.

So, will you ever see a $99 windshield replacement? Windshield replacements for $99 are usually the lowest out-of-pocket cost. How much is a windshield replacement without insurance? It can average between $200-$300. You may be wondering how you can get your windshield replaced for free in your state. Let’s learn about that in the section below.

Which states have windshield replacement laws?

One of the best known free windshield replacement laws exists in Florida. And, out of all 50 states, only Florida, Arizona, Connecticut, Kentucky, Massachusetts, New York, and South Carolina waive the car insurance deductible for windshield repair or replacement. These states are referred to as having free windshield replacement or as being zero deductible states.

Kentucky and Arizona go beyond windshield replacement and include other items, like lights and safety glass on your vehicle, under their zero deductible laws.

However, there is a catch. The catch is that you must have comprehensive coverage, which carries a more expensive premium, before you can reap the benefits.

Some states will cover the cost of your windshield repairs but require the customer to pay the difference in price if the insurance provider gets a cheaper estimate. This repairs law holds in the following states:

  • Delaware
  • Georgia
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Nevada
  • Utah
  • Wisconsin

The state of California has no specific written laws for glass repairs. It is one of 22 states that do not impose specific guidelines on residents. But, is there free windshield replacement in states like California? The answer is no, not exactly. While zero-deductible windshield replacement may be offered with comprehensive coverage, it is not a law.

New Jersey’s standard comprehensive deductible is $750. This is quite pricey.

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Where can I get auto glass repaired?

State laws can also affect where the repair is done and what you pay. Auto glass repair should take place at a credible auto glass shop, preferably one near you. Safelite AutoGlass® is a popular option for those looking to replace a damaged windshield. Your insurance claim money will be verified by Safelite and go towards repairing your vehicle.

Do you get to choose the vendor doing the repair?

If your insurance covers your auto glass repairs, you may be wondering whether or not you get to choose the vendor.

In Arizona, Arkansas, California, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, and Washington, the customer has the right to choose a vendor. These states don’t require the customer to pay the difference in the quote, either.

What are the parts allowed?

OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) parts are products made by the original product producer. Aftermarket parts are made by a company other than your vehicle’s original manufacturer. When considering OEM windshields (Original Equipment Manufacturer) are preferable to aftermarket parts since they are the easiest to use as replacements since their molding and attachments are identical to the original product.

The companies providing OEM windshields are AP Tech, Pilkington, and PPG. With years of building a trusted reputation, major automotive brands rely on these companies to supply their windshields.

Are OEM parts better than aftermarket manufacturer parts? As with most questions, you’ll find strong opinions on both sides of this question. The simplest solution is to ask your dealer or mechanic about the part you are considering replacing. They will steer you in the right direction of pros and cons in this area.

You may also consider dealer windshields as an option. The same companies providing OEM windshields also provide dealer windshields. Wondering where to buy a new windshield? You can choose from AP Tech, Pilkington, or PPG, the top three manufacturers. Here, the manufacturer simply adds the dealer brand to a corner of the windshield.

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Are non-OEM parts allowed for claimed repairs?

To say that parts are “used” is a bit misleading. The terms “OEM” and “aftermarket” are more accurate.

There are 36 states in the U.S. that allow non-OEM or “used” car parts.

This is good news for those 36 states. So, if non-OEM or used parts are allowed, are there regulations on them? The answer is that 29 of those 36 states have one or more of the following stipulations: non-OEM or used parts are allowed with written notice, parts must be equal in fit, quality, performance, and warranty, or consumers pay the difference if they only want OEM parts.

The table below shows specifications, by state, on used parts.

State Specifications on the Use of Used Auto Parts
StateUsed Parts Allowed
AlabamaParts must be of like kind and quality and restore the vehicle to its value.
IndianaConsumer has the choice of OEM, aftermarket, or used parts if the vehicle is under five years old.
IowaAftermarket parts are only allowed on replacements excluding the windshield.
MarylandNon-OEM parts are allowed unless the consumer purchased a waiver for OEM parts prior to the loss.
MassachusettsNon-OEM parts are allowed unless the consumer purchased a waiver for OEM parts prior to the loss.
MinnesotaInsurers may choose aftermarket parts for windshields and used OEM parts for all other repairs.
New HampshireNon-OEM parts allowed unless the consumer has a two-year-old vehicle (or newer) with under 30,000 miles and requests OEM parts.
Rhode IslandNon-OEM parts allowed unless the car is 30 months old or less, then the consumer must be notified in writing and give consent.
West VirginiaFor cars younger than three years, insurers must use OEM parts unless consumer waives in writing.
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While states such as Indiana offer their residents the option of OEM, aftermarket, or used parts (if the vehicle is under five years old), most states will stipulate that OEM parts must be used on vehicles newer than two years old.

Which windshield should you choose?

It’s important to weigh your options when buying a new windshield. Given the three main types of windshields to choose from, the options seem a bit overwhelming. Here are a few things to consider.

  • Quality. Aftermarket windshields are not held to the same standards as dealer or OEM products.
  • Price. Aftermarket windshields are usually far less expensive than the other two options.
  • Safety. OEM and dealer glass is made to fit a vehicle perfectly. These windshields are designed to ensure a snug fit and are safer. The OEM will pass all regulations set into place by the government.

Many times, automotive professionals will suggest OEM or dealer windshield replacement.  This is especially true for newer vehicles.

If I have glass repaired, what is my deductible?

Many states have laws dictating what insurance providers can charge you for glass repair. Some states require zero-deductible glass coverage. Unfortunately, 43 of the 51 states have no law in effect where zero-deductibles are mandatory. However, insurance companies in those states may still offer zero-deductible glass coverage if they so choose.

The general rule of thumb is that the higher your deductible, the more affordable your annual insurance payments are. The catch is that you will have to pay more out-of-pocket if your vehicle sustains damage.

If your deductible is $1,000, and fixing your windshield damage costs $250, then you will need to pay for that entire repair out of your pocket. You’ll most likely want to make a claim because your insurance rates could potentially go up. A car insurance claim is a request for insurance to help pay for damage to your vehicle.

Wondering if you’ll have to meet that deductible with full glass coverage? The good news is, keeping full glass coverage often waives your deductible. If you need auto glass replacement, you could waive your deductible by adding full glass. Fortunately, those living in the following eight states have zero-deductible coverage available to them.

States with Zero Deductible Car Insurance Policy Availability
StatesZero Deductible Policy Requirements
ArizonaInsurance companies are required to offer a zero deductible glass repair policy.
Connecticut Insurance companies are required to offer a zero deductible glass repair policy.
Florida The state law waives the deductible for windshields only.
Kentucky The state law waives the deductible for all auto glass.
Massachusetts The coverage options include a zero and $100 deductible.
Minnesota Insurance companies are required to offer a zero deductible glass repair policy.
New YorkInsurance companies are required to offer a zero deductible glass repair policy.
South CarolinaThe state law waives the deductible for all auto glass.
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You can count on Arizona, Connecticut, Minnesota, and New York, which are required to offer a zero deductible glass repair policy. The law for NYS glass coverage (New York State) reads as follows:

No. N.Y. Ins. Law § 3411(k) (McKinney 2007) prohibits an authorized insurer from offering a deductible for collision coverage/comprehensive coverage on private passenger automobiles, except that window glass coverage may be sold without a deductible.

As the law states, insurers should charge a deductible — but are not required to for glass coverage.

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Does zero-deductible apply to all windows or just to windshields?

In some states, the law states that you may get free windshield replacement as long as you have the necessary comprehensive coverage. Some states offer free windshield replacement by law as long as you have the required comprehensive coverage. Searching for “free windshield replacement near me” may help to narrow this search.

Others require you to purchase additional windshield protection if you don’t want to have to go out of pocket ever for windshield repair or replacement.

How do I find windshield replacement companies?

After you make your windshield insurance claim, the next step is finding the right parts and a company to do the replacement.

Complete State Laws: What are the requirements for full coverage car insurance by state?

The table below details the car part repair and replacement laws for each state.

Car Part Replacement and Repair Requirements by State
STATEREPLACEMENTREPAIRZERO DEDUCTIBLE WITH COMPREHENSIVE COVERAGE
AlabamaParts must be like kind and quality and restore vehicle to value before lossNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
AlaskaNo specifications in law found.No specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
ArizonaAftermarket parts allowed with written notice and at least equal in terms of fit, quality, performance, and warrantyConsumer has right to choose repair vendorYes - optional
ArkansasAftermarket parts allowed with written notice and at least equal in terms of fit, quality, performance, and warrantyConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
CaliforniaAftermarket parts allowed with written notice and at least equal in terms of fit, quality, performance, and warrantyConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
ColoradoNo specifications in law found.No specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
ConnecticutAftermarket and used parts allowed with written noticeConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteYes - optional
DelawareAftermarket and used parts allowed with written notice; consumer may refuse but pays the difference in quoteConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
District of ColumbiaNo specifications in law found.No specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
FloridaParts must be of same quality, fit and performanceNo specifications in law found.Yes - state law waives deductible for windshields only
GeorgiaAftermarket and used parts allowed with written notice and guarantee; consumer may refuse but pays the difference in quoteConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
HawaiiNo specifications in law found.No specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
IdahoAftermarket crash and used parts allowed with written notice; consumer may refuse but pays the difference in quoteNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
IllinoisAftermarket and used parts allowed with written notice in estimate; consumer may refuse but pays the difference in quoteNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
IndianaConsumer choice of OEM, aftermarket or used if vehicle less than 5 years oldNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
IowaAftermarket crash parts (specifically excluding windshields) may be used if they are “at least equal in kind and quality … in terms of fit, quality and performance, or that the part complies with federal safety standards”, if mentioned in the policy; consumer may refuse but pays difference in quoteNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
KansasInsurance company chooses if using aftermarket parts that are of like kind and qualityInsurance company may choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
KentuckyAftermarket and used parts allowed, consumer may refuse but pays difference in quoteConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteYes - state law waives deductible for auto glass
LouisianaNon-OEM aftermarket crash parts allowed with written noticeMax comprehensive deductible is $250Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
MaineAftermarket and used parts allowed, consumer may refuse but pays difference in quoteConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
MarylandAftermarket parts of like kind and quality and used parts allowed unless insurer had waiver purchased for OEM parts prior to lossConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
MassachusettsOEM parts for 2004 and newer vehicles with less than 20,000 miles and 15,000 miles for 2003 and older vehiclesNo specifications in law found.Yes - optional with no deductible or $100 deductible
MichiganAftermarket parts may be requested by insurance company, but must be identified on written estimateConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
MinnesotaInsurers may choose aftermarket parts for windshields and used OEM parts for all other repairsConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteYes - optional; insurance companies required to offer policy
MississippiInsurers may choose aftermarket parts, and aftermarket crash parts may be used if noted on estimateConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
MissouriAftermarket parts may be used, if stated on the estimate, and the parts are “at least equal in like, kind and quality in terms of fit, quality and performance”Insurer may choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
MontanaNo specifications in law found.Consumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
NebraskaNo specifications in law found.Insurer may choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
NevadaNo specifications in law found.Consumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
New HampshireAftermarket parts of like kind and quality and used parts allowed unless consumer has two year old or newer vehicle with less than 30,000 miles and requests OEM partsConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
New JerseyNo specifications in law found.Standard comprehensive deductible is $750Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
New MexicoInsurers may choose aftermarket parts if like kind and qualityNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
New YorkAftermarket parts allowed with written notice and at least equal in terms of fit, form, finish, quality, and performanceNo specifications in law found.Yes - optional
North CarolinaAftermarket parts allowed with written notice and at least equal in terms of fit, quality, performance, and warrantyConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
North DakotaInsurers may choose aftermarket parts if comparable to OEMNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
OhioAftermarket parts allowed, consumer may refuse but pays difference in quoteConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
OklahomaAftermarket parts allowedInsurer may choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
OregonInsurers may use aftermarket crash parts if it is at least the same quality with respect to fit, finish, function and corrosion resistanceConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
PennsylvaniaNo specifications in law found.Consumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
Rhode IslandAftermarket parts at least equal in kind and quality may be used unless car is 30 months old or less; then consumer must be notified in writing and gives consentNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
South CarolinaNo specifications in law found.No specifications in law found.Yes - state law waives deductible for auto glass
South DakotaAftermarket crash parts allowed with written notice in estimateConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
TennesseeNo specifications in law found.No specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
TexasAftermarket and used parts of like kind and quality allowedConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
UtahAftermarket crash parts allowed with disclosureConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
VermontAftermarket and used parts of like kind and quality allowedConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
VirginiaAftermarket parts allowed if they are at least equal in like kind and quality in terms of fit, quality and performance and a statement appears on the estimateNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
WashingtonAftermarket and used parts of like kind and quality allowed; consumer may refuse but pays the difference in quoteConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
West VirginiaFor cars younger than 3 years, insurers must use OEM parts unless consumer waives in writingNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
WisconsinAftermarket and used parts allowed; consumer may refuse but pays the difference in quoteConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
WyomingNo specifications in law found.No specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
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After reading this article, you might be surprised at how complicated glass coverage can be. That’s why we’re here to tie it all together. We hope that you’ve found the information you need to protect, repair, and insure your vehicle’s windshield. What was the most helpful part of this guide?

Now that you know what states have full glass coverage, you can choose the right insurance company by using our free online tool. Just enter your ZIP code in the quote box below.

Editorial Guidelines: We are a free online resource for anyone interested in learning more about auto insurance. Our goal is to be an objective, third-party resource for everything auto insurance related. We update our site regularly, and all content is reviewed by auto insurance experts.

A former insurance producer, Laura understands that education is key when it comes to buying insurance. She has happily dedicated many hours to helping her clients understand how the insurance marketplace works so they can find the best car, home, and life insurance products for their needs.

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Written by Laura Berry
Former Insurance Agent Laura Berry

Joel Ohman is the CEO of a private equity backed digital media company. He is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™, author, angel investor, and serial entrepreneur who loves creating new things, whether books or businesses. He has also previously served as the founder and resident CFP® of a national insurance agency, Real Time Health Quotes. He has an MBA from the University of South Florida. Jo...

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Reviewed by Joel Ohman
Founder & CFP® Joel Ohman

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